Bahama Islands


Taino people moved into the uninhabited southern Bahamas from Hispaniola and Cuba around the 11th century AD, having migrated there from South America. They came to be known as the Lucayans. An estimated 30,000 Lucayans inhabited the Bahamas at the time of Christopher Columbus' arrival in 1492. The Spanish forced much of the Lucayan population to Hispaniola for use as forced labor; together with suffering from exposure to diseases to which they had no immunity, they suffered high fatalities. The population of the Bahamas was severely diminished. Half of the Tainos were killed by smallpox after Columbus's arrival in the Bahamas. Historians had long believed that Europeans generally did not begin to colonize the islands until the mid-17th century. However, recent research suggests that there may have been attempts to settle the islands by groups from Spain, France, and Britain, as well as by other Amerindians. In 1648, the Eleutherian Adventurers, led by William Sayle, migrated from Bermuda. These English Puritans established the first permanent European settlement on an island which they named Eleuthera—the name derives from the Greek word for freedom. In 1670 King Charles II granted the islands to the Lords Proprietors of the Carolinas, who rented the islands from the king with rights of trading, tax, appointing governors, and administering the country. In 1684 Spanish corsair Juan de Alcon raided the capital, Charles Town (later renamed Nassau). In 1703 a joint Franco-Spanish expedition briefly occupied the Bahamian capital during the War of the Spanish Succession. During proprietary rule, the Bahamas became a haven for pirates, including the infamous Blackbeard. Britain made the Bahamas a crown colony in 1718 under the royal governorship of Woodes Rogers. In 1782, following the British defeat at Yorktown, a Spanish fleet appeared off the coast of Nassau, and the city surrendered without a fight. Spain returned possession of the Bahamas to Britain the following year, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris. The British Parliament authorized the islands as internally self-governing in 1964. In 1973, the Bahamas became fully independent as a Commonwealth realm, retaining membership in the Commonwealth of Nations.

Service packages

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Service item Express Standard Optimum
Company registration
Legal address per year
Secretarial services for the first year
Fees and duties for the first year
Apostilled bound set of incorporation documents
Compliance fee
Nominee service per year
Bank Account Pre-approval
Price

2 600 USD

3 965 USD

4 465 USD

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Contact method: and / or

Core Services

2 600 USD

— Incorporation

including incorporation tax, state registry fee, including Compliance fee

included

— Annual government fees

Stamp Duty and Companies Registry incorporation fee

1 675 USD

— Corporate legal services

including registered address and registered agent, NOT including Compliance fee

155 USD

—Delivery of documents by courier mail

DHL or TNT, at cost of a Courier Service

655 USD

— Apostilled set of Statutory documents

Optional services

375 USD

Nominee Shareholder

Paid-up “nominee shareholder” set includes the following documents

Related services

Tax Certificate

Company’s tax exemption certificate

475 USD

Certificate of Good Standing

Document issued by a state agency in some countries (Registrar of companies) to confirm a current status of a body corporate. A company with such certificate is proved to be active and operating.

430 USD

Certificate of Incumbency

Compliance fee

Compliance fee is payable in the cases of: renewal of a company, liquidation of a company, transfer out of a company, issue of a power of attorney to a new attorney, change of director / shareholder / BO (except the change to a nominee director / shareholder)

150 USD

Basic

simple company structure with only 1 physical person

50 USD

For legal entity in structure under GSL administration

additional compliance fee for legal entity in structure under GSL administration (per 1 entity)

100 USD

For legal entity in structure not under GSL administration

additional compliance fee for legal entity in structure NOT under GSL administration (per 1 entity)

250 USD

For client with high risk Status

Cost of incorporation, including first year servicing 2600
Cost of nominee director services per year, including an apostilled set of documents 990
Cost of nominee shareholder services per year, including an apostilled set of documents 375
Cost of annual service, starting from the second year 1675
Open account in 26780
Incorporation timescale for a turnkey company 5-7 days
Country 26689

General information shortly

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Total area Population Capital Unemployment Corruption perceptions index rank
13.939 sq. km 319.031 (2013) Nassau 15.4% (2013) 22 (2013)
Location Caribbean, chain of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean, southeast of Florida, northeast of Cuba
National currency Bahamian dollar
Conditional reduction of currency BSD
Against USD 0.99
Climate, average max and min t° Tropical marine; moderated by warm waters of Gulf Stream; avg. maximum temperature (July) +35°; avg. minimum temperature (January) +18°
Time difference from Moscow - 8 hours
Dialing code +1-242
State language English
Ethnic groups Black 85%, white 12%, Asian and Hispanic 3%
Literacy rate 95.6%
Credit rating BBB+
Government type parliamentary constitutional monarchy
Executive branch prime minister and his cabinet
Legislative branch bicameral Parliament: Senate (16 members) and House of Assembly (38 members)
Judicial branch Privy Council in London, High Court, magistrate courts
GDP per capita rank 28 (2013)

Corporate info

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Shelf companies permitted Legal system Incorporation timescale for a turnkey company Cyrillic alphabet permitted in company name Local registered office
No based on English Common Law 5-7 days No Yes
Types of entity international business company; domestic limited company; company limited by guarantee; unlimited company; foreign company; segregated account company; joint venture, general partnership; limited liability partnership; exempted limited partnership; undisclosed partnership; sole proprietorship; trusts; foundations
Incorporation timescale for a new company 5-7 business days
Company suffix “Limited”, “Limited Liability Company”, “Corporation”, “Incorporated”, “Gesellschaft mit beschrankter Haftung”, “Societe Anonyme” or “Sociedad Anonima” or its respective abbreviation “Ltd.”, “LLC”, “Corp.”, “Inc.”, “GmbH”, or “S. A.”
Sensitive words “Assurance”, “Bank”, “Building Society”, “Chamber of Commerce”, “Chartered”, “Cooperative”, “Imperial”, “Insurance”, “Municipal”, “Royal”, “Trust”
Local registered agent Yes
Information to be kept at the registered office a copy of the Memorandum and Articles and all amendments thereto; a register of all its directors and officers
Seal required, type of seal an IBC shall have a common seal and an imprint thereof shall be kept at the registered office of the company
Redomiciliation (to, from) permitted permitted

Director and secretary

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Minimum number of directors Residency requirements for directors Corporate directors permitted Disclosure to local agent Disclosure to public
1 No Yes Yes Yes
Directors’ meetings/frequency/location Yes / no requirements / anywhere
Company secretary required No
Residency requirements for a secretary No
Qualified secretary required No
Corporate secretary permitted No

Shareholder and beneficiary

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Minimum number of shareholders Residency requirements for shareholders Corporate shareholder permitted Disclosure to local agent Disclosure to public
1 No Yes Yes No
Meetings/frequency/location Yes / no requirements / anywhere
Beneficiary info disclosure to No

Shares and share capital

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Minimum authorized share capital Minimum issued share capital Minimum paid share capital Authorized capital payment deadlines Bearer shares permitted
No requirements No requirements No requirements No requirements No
Issued capital payment deadlines No requirements
Standard currency US Dollar
Standard authorized share capital 50000
Standard par value of shares 1
Shares with no par value permitted Yes

Taxes

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Min. rate for corporate tax Capital gains tax VAT Withholding tax Exchange control
No No 12% No There are special rules for conducting foreign exchange transactions
Personal tax No
Corporate tax (in detail) Companies in the Bahamas are not subject to direct taxes.
Capital gains tax. Details There is no capital gains tax in Bahamas.
VAT. Details VAT is paid at the rate of 12%.
Other taxes Social contributions, Property taxes
Stamp duty Collected in relation to rentals of real estate in Bermuda from the amount of the annual rent

Accounts

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Requirement to file accounts Publicly accessible accounts Audit required Requirement to file Annual Return Publicly accessible Annual Return
No No No No No
Requirement to prepare accounts Yes
Tax Exchange Information Agreement network 33
OECD member No
Offshore/onshore status according to the RF laws Yes

GENERAL INFORMATION

General Info

The Bahamas, officially the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, is an island country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays and islets in the Atlantic Ocean; north of Cuba and Hispaniola; northwest of the Turks and Caicos Islands; southeast of the U.S. state of Florida and east of the Florida Keys.
Total area of the country is 13.939 sq. km. The population is 319.031 (2013). Among ethnic groups are Black 85%, white 12%, Asian and Hispanic 3%.
The capital is Nassau.
The official language is English.
The currency is Bahamian dollar (BSD). 1 USD is equal to 0.99 BSD.
Climate of the Bahamas is tropical marine; moderated by warm waters of Gulf Stream; avg. maximum temperature (July) +35°; avg. minimum temperature (January) +18°..
Time difference with Moscow is -8 hours.
Literacy rate is 95.6%.
Calling code is +1-242.

History

Taino people moved into the uninhabited southern Bahamas from Hispaniola and Cuba around the 11th century AD, having migrated there from South America. They came to be known as the Lucayans. An estimated 30,000 Lucayans inhabited the Bahamas at the time of Christopher Columbus' arrival in 1492.
The Spanish forced much of the Lucayan population to Hispaniola for use as forced labor; together with suffering from exposure to diseases to which they had no immunity, they suffered high fatalities. The population of the Bahamas was severely diminished. Half of the Tainos were killed by smallpox after Columbus's arrival in the Bahamas.
Historians had long believed that Europeans generally did not begin to colonize the islands until the mid-17th century. However, recent research suggests that there may have been attempts to settle the islands by groups from Spain, France, and Britain, as well as by other Amerindians. In 1648, the Eleutherian Adventurers, led by William Sayle, migrated from Bermuda. These English Puritans established the first permanent European settlement on an island which they named Eleuthera—the name derives from the Greek word for freedom.
In 1670 King Charles II granted the islands to the Lords Proprietors of the Carolinas, who rented the islands from the king with rights of trading, tax, appointing governors, and administering the country. In 1684 Spanish corsair Juan de Alcon raided the capital, Charles Town (later renamed Nassau). In 1703 a joint Franco-Spanish expedition briefly occupied the Bahamian capital during the War of the Spanish Succession.
During proprietary rule, the Bahamas became a haven for pirates, including the infamous Blackbeard. Britain made the Bahamas a crown colony in 1718 under the royal governorship of Woodes Rogers.
In 1782, following the British defeat at Yorktown, a Spanish fleet appeared off the coast of Nassau, and the city surrendered without a fight. Spain returned possession of the Bahamas to Britain the following year, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris.
The British Parliament authorized the islands as internally self-governing in 1964. In 1973, the Bahamas became fully independent as a Commonwealth realm, retaining membership in the Commonwealth of Nations.

Government Type

The Bahamas is a parliamentary constitutional monarchy.
The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II represented by a Governor-General.
Executive power belongs to the government, headed by the prime minister. The Prime Minister selects the Cabinet.
Legislative power is vested in a bicameral Parliament, which consists of a 38-member House of Assembly (the lower house), with members elected from single-member districts, and a 16-member Senate, with members appointed by the Governor-General.
Judicial power comprises Privy Council in London, High Court, magistrate courts.

Economy

One of the most prosperous countries in the West Indies, The Bahamas relies on tourism to generate most of its economic activity. Tourism as an industry not only accounts for over 60% of the Bahamian GDP, but provides jobs for more than half the country's workforce. After tourism, the next most important economic sector is financial services, accounting for some 15 percent of GDP.
Agriculture (5% of employed) – citrus fruit, vegetables, poultry.
Industry (5% of employed) – cement production, petroleum transportation, salt production, rum production, aragonite mining, pharmaceutical production.
By the terms of GDP per capita, the Bahamas is one of the richest countries in the Americas.

CORPORATE INFORMATION

Legal System

The legal system in the Bahamas is based upon the English common law.
The offshore companies or IBCs are regulated by the International Business Corporations Act 2000.

Types of Entity

The principal forms of business organization in the Bahamas are:
  • international business company;
  • domestic limited company;
  • company limited by guarantee;
  • unlimited company;
  • foreign company;
  • segregated account company;
  • joint venture,
  • general partnership;
  • limited liability partnership;
  • exempted limited partnership;
  • undisclosed partnership;
  • sole proprietorship;
  • trusts;
  • foundations

For offshore solutions, the most common structure is the IBC.

REGISTRATION

Company Name

There is a range of requirements to the company name in the Bahamas:

  • The word “Limited”, “Limited Liability Company”, “Corporation”, “Incorporated”, “Gesellschaft mit beschrankter Haftung”, “Societe Anonyme” or “Sociedad Anonima” or its respective abbreviation “Ltd.”, “LLC”, “Corp.”, “Inc.”, “GmbH”, or “S. A.” shall be at the end of the name of every company with limited liability.
  • A name should not be identical with that under which a company in existence is already incorporated under or so nearly resemble the name of another company as to be calculated to deceive, except where the company in existence gives its consent.
  • A name should not contain, without express prior permission of the Registrar which permission may be withheld without assigning a reason, the words “Assurance”, “Bank”, “Building Society”, “Chamber of Commerce”, “Chartered”, “Cooperative”, “Imperial”, “Insurance”, “Municipal”, “Royal”, “Trust”, or a word conveying a similar meaning, or any other word that, in the opinion of the Registrar, suggests or is calculated to suggest the patronage of or any connection with Her Majesty or any member of the Royal Family or the Government of The Bahamas, a department thereof, a statutory corporation or board or a local or municipal authority.
  • A company name should not be indecent, offensive or, in the opinion of the Registrar otherwise objectionable.

In case of the violation of the above, the Registrar may, whether or not the consent of the company in existence give notice to the last registered company to change its name and if it fails to do so within 60 days from the date of the notice the Registrar shall direct the company to change its name to such name as the Registrar deems appropriate, and the Registrar shall publish a notice of the change in the Gazette.

Registration of IBC

The following steps are required to incorporate an IBC in the Bahamas:

  1. Search for a company name and reserve the proposed name: it is mainly done online or by lawyers and service providers who include the name fees in their fees. The name reservation expires after 90 days.
  2. The registered agent prepares and notarizes the company documents: the required documents include - Letter of Compliance pursuant to section 15 (4) of the IBC Act; Memorandum and Articles of Association.
  3. Pay the incorporation fee
  4. File the company documents at the Companies Registry: The registration is usually done by the lawyer. The company is incorporated on the date that the incorporation documents are submitted to the Companies Registry.

It takes 1 to 7 business days to register an IBC.

Restriction on Activities

The following restrictions apply on IBCs’ activities:

  • no business may be transacted with residents in the Bahamas;
  • no ownership interest in real property in the Bahamas is permitted; property may be leased for office use only;
  • banking, insurance or re-insurance business is not permitted;
  • engaging in the business of company management or providing registered facilities for Bahamian incorporated companies is not permitted.

However, IBCs are permitted to own shares in other Bahamian companies, maintain bank accounts in the jurisdiction and employ the services of local professionals.

Local Registered Office

A company shall at all times have a registered office in The Bahamas.
The address of the registered office shall be submitted to the Registrar with the Memorandum for registration upon the date of the application for incorporation.
The directors of the company may change the address of the registered office of the company, which change shall be notified to the Registrar within 14 days after such change has been made.
The following information should be kept at the registered office:

  • a copy of the Memorandum and Articles and all amendments thereto;
  • a register of all its directors and officers

Registered Agent

A company shall at all times have a registered agent in The Bahamas.
No person shall act as registered agent unless he is licensed to carry on the business of financial and corporate services pursuant to section 3 of the Financial and Corporate Service Providers Act:
The name and address of the registered agent shall be submitted to the Registrar for registration at the date of incorporation of the company.
The company shall notify the Registrar of any change in the name or address of the registered agent.
Where the registered agent of a company desires to cease to act as registered agent and the registered agent is unable to reach an agreement with the company for which he is registered agent concerning his replacement, the following provisions shall apply —
  • the registered agent shall give not less than 90 days written notice to any director or officer of the company of which he is the registered agent at the director’s or officer’s last known address, or if the registered agent is not aware of the identity of any director or officer then the person from whom the registered agent last received instructions concerning the company, specifying the wish of the registered agent to resign as registered agent;
  • the registered agent shall, in writing, inform the Registrar that he has served the notice referred to one of the abovementioned persons;
  • if, at the time of the expiry of the notice, the company has not notified the Registrar or the registered agent of any change in the name or address of its registered agent, the registered agent shall inform the Registrar in writing that the company has not changed its registered agent whereupon the Registrar shall publish a notice in the Gazette that the name of the company will be struck off the Register, unless the company, within thirty days from the date of the publication of the notice in the Gazette, notifies the Registrar of the change in the name or address of its registered agent; and
  • if a company fails within thirty days from the date of the publication of the notice to notify the Registrar of the change in the name or address of its registered agent, the Registrar shall strike the name of the company off the Register and shall publish in the Gazette a notice that the name of the company has been struck off the Register.

Seal

A company shall have a common seal and an imprint thereof shall be kept at the registered office of the company.

Redomicile

The redomiciliation of companies to or from the Bahamas is permitted.
A company incorporated under the laws of a jurisdiction outside The Bahamas may continue as a company incorporated under IBC Act as follows —

  • articles of continuation, written in the English language or if written in a language other than the English language, accompanied by a certified translation into the English language, shall be approved by a majority of the directors or the other persons who are charged with exercising the powers of the company;
  • the articles of continuation shall contain — (i) the name of the company and the name under which it is being continued; (ii) the jurisdiction under which it is incorporated; (iii) the date on which it was incorporated; (iv) the information required to be included in a Memorandum under section 13(1); and (v) the amendments to its Memorandum and Articles, or their equivalent, that are to be effective upon the registration of the articles of continuation;
  • the articles of continuation, accompanied by a copy of the Memorandum and Articles of the company, or their equivalent, written in the English language or if written in a language other than the English language, accompanied by a certified translation into the English language and in the case of a foreign company, evidence satisfactory to the Registrar that the company is in good standing, shall be submitted to the Registrar who shall retain and register them in the register; and
  • upon the registration of the articles of continuation, the Registrar shall issue a certificate of continuation under his hand and seal certifying that the company is incorporated under this Act.

Subject to any limitations in its Memorandum or Articles a company incorporated under IBC Act may, by a resolution of directors or by a resolution of members, continue as a company incorporated under the laws of a jurisdiction outside The Bahamas in the manner provided under those laws.
A company incorporated under IBC Act that continues as a company incorporated under the laws of a jurisdiction outside The Bahamas, does not cease to be a company incorporated under IBC Act unless the laws of the jurisdiction outside The Bahamas permit the continuation and the company has complied with those laws.

COMPANY STRUCTURE

Directors

An IBC shall be managed by at least one director who may be an individual or a company. Directors need not be resident in the Bahamas and there is no stipulation as to their nationality.
A company shall keep a register to be known as a register of directors and officers containing —

  • the names and addresses of the persons who are directors and officers of the company;
  • the date on which each person whose name is entered in the register was appointed as a director or officer of the company; and
  • the date on which each person as a director or officer ceased to be a director or officer of the company.

The register of directors and officers may be in such form as the directors approve, but if it is in magnetic, electronic or other data storage form, the company must be able to produce legible evidence of its contents.
The register of directors and officers, commencing from the date of the registration of the company, shall be kept at the registered office of the company.
A copy of the register of directors and officers shall be filed with the Registrar and shall be open to inspection by members of the public during official hours. The register of a company shall be filed with the Registrar within twelve months after the appointment of the directors and officers of that company. Where the register has not been filed within this period the company may be struck off the Register.
Directors meetings need not be held in the Bahamas and can be held by telephone.

Secretary

There is no statutory requirement for a secretary in the Bahamas.

Shareholders

The minimum requirement for a Bahamian IBC is one shareholder. Shareholders may be either a natural person or a corporate entity. Shareholders may be of any nationality and reside in any country. Nominee Shareholders are allowed.
A Bahamian IBC does not need to hold an Annual General Meeting of its shareholders. Shareholders and directors meetings need not be held in the Bahamas and can be held by telephone.
Shareholders’ details are not available to public.

Beneficiary

Until 2001, there was no need to register details of beneficial owners, directors or officers, but under the International Businesses Companies Act 2001 which came into force at the start of 2001 IBCs are required to submit their identities, addresses and names of directors and owners to the Registrar General's Department. However, beneficiary's detailes are disclosed only to registered agent.

Share Capital and Shares

There is no minimum capital requirement.
Shares must be registered and may be issued in any currency.
Bearer shares are no longer permitted.
Shares can be issued at a par or a non-par value.
Standard amount of capital is 50000 US dollars.

TAXATION

Personal Income Tax

None.

Corporate Income Tax

None.

CFC Rules

There are no CFC rules in place.

VAT

VAT is paid at the rate of 12%.

Withholding Tax

None.

Social Security Contributions

The employer and the employee pay social security contributions on employment remuneration.
The general rate is 9.8%, of which 3.9% is payable by the employee and 5.9% by the employer.
These contributions do not apply to earnings exceeding BSD 710 per week.

Property Tax

The tax is charged on the market value of the property at rates depending on the type and value of the property.
Stamp duty is levied on Bahamas immovable property rentals on the amount of the annual rent.
Fees are also levied in relation to other immovable property transactions, as well as in relation to certain other transactions.

Exchange Control

The Bahamas has foreign exchange controls and certain restrictions, in particular on foreign exchange transactions for residents and on transactions in Bahamian dollars for non-residents.
There are special rules for making foreign exchange transactions.

ACCOUNTS

Accounting Records

A Bahamas IBC needs to maintain accounting records. These accounting records may be maintained in any currency and may be held anywhere in the world.

Financial Statements

A Bahamas IBC is required to prepare financial statements under IFRS. These need not be filed with the Registrar of Companies.
A Bahamas IBC is not required to have its accounts audited.

Annual Return

There is no requirement for a Bahamas IBC to submit an annual return.

Tax Returns

As there is no corporate income tax, no corporate income tax return is filed.

BAHAMAS MARITIME AUTHORITY

Ship Registration

The Bahamas Maritime Authority (BMA) welcomes all types of vessels to the register while ensuring certain legal and safety standards are met. As part of the registration requirements, the technical suitability and age of a vessel are also taken into consideration before it is accepted to fly the Bahamas Flag.
Foreign-owned ships engaged in international trade may be registered in The Bahamas. Vessels over 12 years old are subject to a pre-registration inspection undertaken by an authorised Bahamas inspector and applications are approved on an individual basis.
A foreign owner, irrespective of nationality or place of incorporation, can hold direct title to a Bahamas-flagged ship but some foreign owners find it useful to incorporate a Bahamian company for this purpose primarily because there is no income tax or capital gains tax in The Bahamas. The operation and income of a Bahamian registered ship or any capital gain on its sale are therefore completely tax free in The Bahamas whether the vessel is foreign-owned or owned by a Bahamian company.

How to Register

Ship owners wishing to register their vessels under the Bahamas Flag may do so through the London, Nassau, New York or Hong Kong offices. Additionally, registration documents can currently be processed through the Tokyo Agency office.
Full on-the-spot registration services will soon be available in Tokyo as well as Greece and Germany.
To start the registration process, the ship owner, who may be an individual or a corporation, must complete and submit to the Registrar –

  • an Application to Register form (R102) giving the name and general details of the vessel
  • a Registration of Managing Owner form (R104) which provides full contact details of the managers responsible for the day to day management of the ship
  • copies of the vessel's current class certificates

The application will be reviewed and the Registrar will then confirm the vessel's suitability for provisional registration on to the register (as applicable). Further, the Registrar will reserve the vessel's name and issue Bahamas identification details i.e. official number, call sign and MMSI number. The remaining registration forms and required documents listed below should then be submitted together with the applicable registration fees:

  • Provisional Certificate of Registry
  • Radio Communication License
  • Safe Manning Document
  • Ship's Carving and Marking Note
  • Oil Pollution CLC
  • Bunker CLC
  • Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR)
  • LRIT Conformance Test Report (CTR)
  • Declaration of Maritime Labour Compliance (DMLC) - Part 1
  • Set of Ship Statutory Publications

NB: Mortgages may also be registered against a vessel following its provisional registration.
Vessels are provisionally registered for a period of six months to allow owners to complete all flag change formalities and fulfill BMA requirements for permanent registration.
Once all requirements are met, a permanent Certificate of Registry will be issued.

International law relations

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Party to the Hague Convention (Apostille) Legal system Double tax treaties network OECD member Offshore/onshore status according to the RF laws
Yes based on English Common Law No Yes

Public authorities and legal acts

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List of laws and regulations
Act name Scope of law
International Business Companies Act IBC
Companies Act companies
Exchange Control Regulations exchange control
Gaming Act gaming
Real Property Tax Act real property tax
Stamp Act stamp duty
The Bahamas Maritime Authority Act Maritime Authority
Tax treaties entered
Tax Exchange Information Agreement (TEIA) Argentina, Aruba, Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Greenland, Guernsey, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, San Marino, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States
List of state regulatory authorities
Government of Bahamas http://www.bahamas.gov.bs/
Bahamas Maritime Authority http://www.bahamasmaritime.com/
Central Bank of the Bahamas http://www.centralbankbahamas.com
Bahamas Bar Association http://www.bahamasbarassociation.com/

    Legal Partner of Review:

    Overseas Management Company (OMC)

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    Bahamas Company Formation

    Consultants

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    Regards, GSL Law & Consulting Lawyer, Head of UK GSL office Aniko Sebok

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